New Year’s Day was extra special for Brianna Clemons and her children, Jaylen and Ja’liyah. Jaylen returned home a day earlier after an extended stay in a Jackson hospital. The mother credits the heroic action of firefighters and others with saving his life on Dec. 10 when he stopped breathing in their home.
New Year’s Day was extra special for Brianna Clemons and her children, Jaylen and Ja’liyah. Jaylen returned home a day earlier after an extended stay in a Jackson hospital. The mother credits the heroic action of firefighters and others with saving his life on Dec. 10 when he stopped breathing in their home.
While she didn’t get their names that night, Brianna Clemons will never forget the faces of three Philadelphia firefighters who revived her 14-day-old infant son last month.

The child, Jaylen, was released from Blair E. Batson Hospital on Sunday, just in time to welcome in the new year with his sister, Ja’liyah, 2.

Battalion Chief Dale Yates, Captain Dusty Stephens and Firefighter Nicholas Walker were recognized “for their quick action” in treating the child with a resolution passed by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen in December.

Clemons plans to take Jaylen to the fire department as well as to the county hospital soon so they can personally thank those who saved his life.

Jaylen had previously been treated for Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), a virus that causes infection of the lungs and breathing passages, his mother said.

She said mucus apparently got in her son’s airway on the night of Dec. 10 at their home on Cumberland Avenue causing him to stop breathing.

Watching as the firefighters helped revive her son will always be etched in Clemons’ memory and in her heart.

“I went to feed him that night and he wasn’t breathing,” she said. “I panicked. My friend called 911.”

Clemons said a dispatcher gave her friend instructions over the phone as to how she should perform CPR but she was in such a frantic state that she didn’t know what to do, she said.

“I panicked. They came in and grabbed my baby off the floor.  They rushed him to an ambulance to Neshoba General. It took 20 minutes to bring him back to life. They airlifted him to Jackson. He was on a ventilator for a while.”

Jaylen remained in Blair E. Batson for about three weeks.

“It’s a great hospital,” Clemons said. “They took great care of him. I couldn’t ask for a better hospital.”

Clemons is so thankful not only for the first responders but for the numerous people in the community who prayed for her son.

“His grandmothers, Sonya Clemons and Karen Tanksley, have been such a great support and help to me,” she said.

“Both have been my prayer warriors and my support system. I just want to thank everybody, especially the people at the hospital.

“He made such an impact on their lives.”

Engine 2 and Battalion 1 were dispatched to a report of the infant not breathing at 8:14 p.m. on Dec. 10 and arrived on scene within two minutes.

The firefighters made entry into the house to find Clemons holding her 14-day-old baby who had no signs of life. Captain Stephens immediately started CPR on the baby. EMS arrived shortly afterwards, and the care of the baby was turned over to them.

The baby was transported to Neshoba County General Hospital where Engine 2 and Battalion 1 also went to aid in the care. After 20 minutes of Advanced Life Support CPR, a pulse was regained on the baby and he was airlifted to UMC.

The resolution, passed by the Board of Aldermen, commended the firefighters “for their quick action in treating this child. If not for the quick action of these firefighters, the outcome of this call could have been very different.

“It is a proven fact that quick recognition and immediate CPR is the best and only method of treating a patient like this. These firefighters love their job and they are great at what they do. These men are just a part of the greatest fire department that money can buy.”

Mayor James A. Young called the resolution a new trend.

“We don’t do this enough for our fire and police departments who continue to work and save lives,” said Young, a paramedic for 21 years and former director of the county ambulance service.

Young was the one who ushered in Advanced Life Support in Neshoba County in the late 1980s.