MeShay Jimmie, center, of Bogue Chitto was recently crowned the 2014-2015 Choctaw Indian Princces. Kara Edwards,left, of Standing Pine, was named first alternate, and Langley Jim, right, of Pearl River, received second alternate.
MeShay Jimmie, center, of Bogue Chitto was recently crowned the 2014-2015 Choctaw Indian Princces. Kara Edwards,left, of Standing Pine, was named first alternate, and Langley Jim, right, of Pearl River, received second alternate.
MeShay LeAnn Jimmie, a 17-year-old from the Bogue Chitto community, was crowned Choctaw Indian Princess 2014-2015 Wednesday night during the 65th annual Choctaw Fair, calling it "a dream come true."

Jimmie, daughter of Johnny and Valerie Vaughn, won the coveted title and will serve as the Tribe's goodwill ambassador for the next 12 months

"It's indescribable," Jimmie said of her win. "This is a dream come true and I'm loving it."

The senior at Neshoba Central High School was extremely emotional and held back tears as outgoing Princess Lanena Grace John placed the crown on her head.

Jimmie was also named Most Photogenic and Miss Congeniality.

Kara Alaine Edwards, 16, was named first alternate while Langley Bea'Nea Jim, 16, was named second alternate. Edwards also won for best essay.

Edwards is the daughter of Kevin and Sheena Edwards of the Standing Pine community.

Jim is the daughter of Barbarella Jim and Landon Jim of the Pearl River community.

On Thursday, eager Fair spectators packed the Choctaw Central High School gym to hear the story of the Schimmel family, a Native American family with two daughters who are basketball stars.

Rick and Cici Schimmel live on a reservation in Oregon and have eight children. Jude and Shoni both played for the University of Louisville's women's basketball team which that made a run to the Final Four in 2013. Shoni is now a member of the WNBA's Atlanta Dream, and was recently named an All-Star starter in her first season as a professional.

Rick, Cici and Jude were on hand to tell their story and answer questions about how they were able to overcome obstacles and become successful.

Throughout the week spectators lined the edges of the Tribal offices parking lot for the Iron Warrior competition, providing a packed crowd for the finale on Saturday. Participants and onlookers alike fought the mid-afternoon heat to see who completed all of the events in the fastest time.

Thursday and Friday were timed trials, with the course consisting of farmer's carry, steel log press, yoke carry, tire flip, and truck pull. Participants finishing in the top five on Thursday or Friday qualified for the finals on Saturday. The course on Saturday consisted of the same course with keg load, keg carry, and tire drag added to the already strenuous events.

Benjamin Farve was the champion, completing the course with a time of 3:59. Farve received $500 and a medal for winning the competition.

Another popular event was the World Series of Stickball.

Choctaw Central football field saw a standing-room only crowd Saturday as Bok Cito was crowned the new World Series of Stickball champions in the men's open division after defeating Pearl River 3-2.

Garland Bell Jr. was named the tournament's most valuable player.

Stickball is a traditional game for the Choctaw Indians which dates back for centuries. Instead of wars, disputes between communities were settled by stickball games. It is described as the little brother of war, and it lives up to its reputation each year. According to Choctaw information, games were first recorded in the 1700s, but most likely games were played much earlier.