Mississippi State women’s basketball coach Vic Schaeffer, whose team was three seconds away from winning a national title last year, shares his winning philosophy during the Community Development Partnership’s annual banquet Monday night.
Mississippi State women’s basketball coach Vic Schaeffer, whose team was three seconds away from winning a national title last year, shares his winning philosophy during the Community Development Partnership’s annual banquet Monday night.

Mississippi State women's basketball coach Vic Schaeffer said the goal to winning in sports and in business revolves around a number of factors.

Whether it is facing down adversity, like the adversity Schaefer and his family faced when his son Logan suffered a traumatic brain injury several years ago, only to make a full recovery, or holding yourself and others accountable for the work that is done like he does with his women's basketball team. Schaeffer has learned what it takes to be successful.




Schaeffer spoke of these traits and many more things during his speech as part of the 65th annual Community Development Partnership banquet Monday evening at the Neshoba County Coliseum.

During Schaefer's speech, he recounted the story of his son Logan suffering a traumatic brain injury following a wakeboarding accident when his son was 14-years old. The injury was of such significance it caused severe seizures and doctors recommended that the boy be transported to the closest Level I trauma center in Tyler, Texas. Schaeffer recounted the days in the ER and the 11 days in intensive care his son went through as the family hoped for a miracle. Eventually, Logan made it through his ordeal and the rehabilitation that followed to eventually become a student at Mississippi State University.

"My son is a walking, talking miracle," Schaefer said.

Schaefer used his son's story as an example of the adversity everyone faces in their lives.

"Excuses don't matter," Schaefer said. "The question is how do you respond to adversity?"

Schaefer also talked about accountability and responsibility. He said he feels as though those are two traits that don't exist like they used to when he was younger.

Most of all Schaefer discussed the traits of success. He said businesses are a lot like being a college coach. In order to succeed you have to recruit, retain and develop your employees' talents in order to be successful.

During the banquet, two successful area businesses were named business of the year.

The Yates Companies, Inc. was named as Large Business of the Year. Yates Chairman and CEO Bill Yates noted that the company, with corporate offices and home base in Philadelphia, has expanded to include 26 offices in 10 states. The company has worked on projects in all but two of the lower 48 states and has done a number of international projects, according to Yates. Recently, the company has helped to rebuild 22,000 homes destroyed in Puerto Rico as a result of Hurricane Maria.

Yates said that Philadelphia and Neshoba County is an important part of the business noting that what is good for Neshoba County is good for Yates a vice versa.

Central Water Association was named small business of the year. Manager Glenn Goldman was on hand to receive the award for the company. Goldman noted the significant growth the association has seen over the last several years and noted a number of ongoing and upcoming projects the company is engaged in currently.

The final main presentation of the evening was given to Jo Helen Daly who was named as Citizen of the Year. 

Daly, a Neshoba County native, said that when she lived away from home for several years, she noticed something was missing. She noted that other cities that she lived in didn't have a sense of community quite the way Philadelphia and Neshoba County does. 

She said she learned a lot about life from her father, who she said was a quiet and humble man. She said her father taught her the values of humility and service to others.

Daly recounted her years of service in the community, first in her church and then in the wider community. Specifically, Daly discussed her time serving on the board of trustees for the Neshoba General Hospital and Nursing home. She noted that she was thankful that the community has medical services of such a high quality that area residents do not have to travel to other communities in search of medical care.

Daly said she was excited about the growth and development of the Boys and Girls Club, of which she is also a volunteer, during the leadership of Jermaine Harris. She said the club has flourished since merging with the East Mississippi Boys and Girls Club.

Daly also noted her joy of volunteering with Kids Catfish Fishing Rodeo held at Neshoba Lake in June. She said one of her favorite things is to see a child's face when they have caught their first fish.

Over 300 people attended the banquet Monday night and were treated to a steak dinner provided by the Hamasa Shriners Club.